Peter Greer takes a hard look at the motives of the leader.

The vast majority of social entrepreneurs begin their journey of service and mission with the best of intentions. Peter Greer, CEO of microfinance development organization Hope International and Praxis Venture Partner, discovered that despite all the care he took to guard his heart and practices against selfish motives, he was prone to "self-centered service."

In this talk, Peter contrasts the marks of self-centered service with the marks of true service for the sake of others. 



Questions

 

1. Regarding the Gallup poll question "Do you think you're important?": what is your deep-down, default answer? In what ways is your answer affirmed by the gospel, and where is it confronted?

Perhaps the most important follow-up questions are "Important to whom?" and "Important for what?"

As it relates to our importance to God, help each participant see that the gospel confronts and affirms any human self-image. As Tim Keller says, "We are more flawed and sinful than we ever dared believe, yet we are more loved and accepted than we ever dared hope ... We are so bad that he had to die for us, but so loved that he was glad to die for us."

The gospel also speaks to our equal importance and value in the kingdom of God and the body of Christ, whether our public stature is prominent or modest. 

 

2. What is one strength and one vulnerability for your future as a leader that is revealed by your answer to question 1?

Gently press participants to go beyond answers that may be biblically correct but are shallow and generic; model and encourage using specific examples to make each person's answer specific and unique.

 

3. Which expression or practice of self-centered service (undermining impact; undermining family; undermining ourselves) are you most prone to?

Reminders from Peter's talk:

  • Undermining impact: over-exuberance; over-replication; patronizing assumptions
  • Undermining family: "leftovers"; projected performance
  • Undermining ourselves: under-appreciated; karma; overwhelmed
 

4. Which entrepreneurs or leaders have effectively modeled the practices and boundaries of true service that Peter discusses?

 

5. What practice of true service are you already strong in? What practice of true service would be most powerful for you to adopt, and what would it take to change? 

5. What practice of true service are you already strong in? What practice of true service would be most powerful for you to adopt, and what would it take to change?

Reminders from Peter's talk:

  • Strengthening impact: fanatical delegation; partnership as default; success timeline
  • Strengthening families: resignation; guardrails; monitoring & evaluation
  • Strengthening ourselves: no invincibility; prophetic critique 

Additional Readings

Amy Sherman, Kingdom Calling: Vocational Stewardship for the Common Good, Ch 2: What Do the Righteous Look Like? (p 45-63)

Amy Sherman, Kingdom Calling: Vocational Stewardship for the Common Good, Ch 3: Why We Aren't the Tsaddiqim (p 64-76)


Fill out my online form.